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The diplomatic insanity and its cure

Enviado por en enero 5, 2013 – 1:14 am

Arnaldo M. Fernandez

There is a cubanologic surprise almost at every corner. The last one is twisting John Kerry as the Secretary of State with the best pedigree since John Quincy Adams (1767-1848). For it counts even the fact of having been a swift boat captain in Vietnam. This is really important, because Kerry advocated ending the U.S.embargo against Vietnam and now all the fluttering around is aimed to advertise him as better positioned than anyone to ease or even lift the embargo against Cuba.
Again the so-called engagement is displayed as fundamental tool of foreign policy, but through a tortuous analogy, instead of the authentic Cuban-American experience during the Carter or the Clinton administrations. It only can inspire pity the eternal return to the imaginary point that American tourists and Cuban-American visitors would be catalysts for change.
The pro Castro cubanology is even able to find consistency between the nomination of Kerry by the President —an executive act far away from any Cuban-American connection— and the Cuban-American vote for Democrats in the past elections. By the way, the anti-Castroit hard-liners like Ros-Lehtinen and Diaz-Balart, for instance, swept up in their districts.
Neither the alleged flow of information nor the actual flows of hard currency have improved the political and economic situation in Cuba. By no way the USAID well-intended programs for multiplying Internet connectivity rates will have such an impact. The Castroit totalitarian state has proven beyond any reasonable doubt that it knows how to manage itself for turning any foreign program to its favor.
Let’s be frank: as well as the embargo, the engagement has failed. The only realistic way —justified by both the logic and the history—is abstaining for influencing any processes in Cuba and preventing the rampant colonization of South Florida by Castroist enterprises and Cuban immigrants in synergy with them. The U. S. doesn’t need Cuba or Cubans for anything.
Once the U. S. public opinion realizes the squandering of time and money with the picturesque Isle of Cuba, the U.S. politicians will find that there is no better choice for getting rid of insanity in foreign policy than applying to the letter its best principle: nonintervention.

-Illustration: Fidelio Ponce de Leon, a.k.a. Murillo the Mad, Devotional (1947) © ArtExpertsInc

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